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30 excerpts on the topic “Advice”
Golgotha
[…] MD
If you do something do it honestly. It’s really a question of sincerity, to feel profoundly what you really dig and be able to identify it. In order to stake a claim for yourself in this crazy modern graphic design world, you have to have a strong personality […]
Golgotha
[…] GH
If you get out of school and go to work for someone, even if it’s going well and you’re happy you will never say to yourself that you’re going to launch a studio. It’s too late. Whereas the opposite is possible: try it out and if you fail you can go work elsewhere, no hard feelings. […]
Golgotha
[…] MD
If you want to be original and get noticed I think you have to psychoanalyse yourself a little. I know what I like because I took the time to think about it. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] just stay curious and expand your horizon, where you go, what you see, how you navigate. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Always make work for yourself even if you have a job. Make sure you don’t just clock and do
work and go home and not make anything. It’s important to always use your time as a designer, it’s a form of your own expression, how you use your work to be personal, whether no one sees it or not. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Travel, be curious, and don’t worry if things are good or bad, or right or wrong. Just make it and see what happens. Don’t worry about making mistakes, it’s really easy for designers to get
tensed and caught up, especially early, and think about whether it’s going to be wrong.
Mistakes, that’s how you learn and how you get better. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Get good lawyers. Image rights are where it’s at. It seems like an incredibly litigious thing to say, but when you have a good lawyer you can sleep soundly and get going on new projects, lock them down with contracts with everything on the up and up. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] The advice I would give the 30‑year‑old me might be: “Partner with the right people” […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Never Assume (…) It’s not just a business philosophy by the way. Never assume things are going to go well. Never presuppose. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] But, you’re never going to do the whole thing in your whole life, or you’re just a one-man-show. I mean, obviously you can do everything alone but coming from graffiti, I always used to be in a group, or working together with a lot of people, being inspired and learning from the way others work. It’s more fun to be creative in a group of people rather than sitting alone at home and thinking that you’re a genius. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Long-term focus really helps you, and it helps you personally. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] The advice is that you need to study well the company, learn from it, look at its history, the future plans, and most of all really grasp their true mentality, culture, and personality, understand what your own culture might risk, but also what it can gain. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Having a sense of humour, not taking things to heavily is also very important. We can make jokes about our work and tell each other it’s shit. (laugh) Humour is essential. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] following trends and fashion is not bad, there is a reason for it, and it comes and goes. But it’s just you need to be conscious of it and try to create your own answer and reality, that’s what is important. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Do what you love, no matter what, even if you don’t pursue a creative career. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) Time helps making an idea fuller. Making decisions only based on time is a pity. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) When we teach students, we always advise them to be quite straight from the start in what they choose to do. It will get out and thereby it will be stuff you we’ll be asked for. You may be trapped if you want to be part of everything, it gets fussy. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) A strategy is not a guarantee of success…
(MS)…Sometimes producing work is the best thing to do! […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) Don’t bother with what other people think! (…) As time goes by, you have less interest in what other people think and that provides you a feeling of freedom. Unfortunately, to get there you have to get older. (laugh) […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (MS) Make things. Its not about making a lot but in the end we feel that you should not talk and think and write too much about it – at least in our approach, and of course everybody has their own approach – but that you can only talk about your work when you’ve made it and also get experience as you make it […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] I would have liked to know that what I was being told was true, that is to say that our work was much more valuable than we thought. That’s what people kept telling us, yet our experience appeared to contradict that. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Critical distance, introspection, and a talent for self-criticism — these things are essential. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Grow and expand your network. If purchasing databases was all you needed, then everyone would be successful. Essentially it all boils down to being a nice, fun and interesting guy to meet, someone who not only doesn’t waste your time but actually brings something to the table. You’ve got to have humanity, that quality that makes meeting you a pleasant experience. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] When you’re starting out, always assume the client is giving you a vote of confidence. But this can only happen if you exude self-confidence. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] You’ve got to go whole hog. It’s all or nothing. You’ve got to give yourself entirely over to the project, be as demanding with it as you are in your approach to typography — what I mean is perfection or nothing, no middle ground. You’ve got to have that goal. I don’t mean to be too peremptory by saying “give me excellence or give me death,” but you must in any case aim for excellence and enjoy the process of attempting to attain it. Because otherwise you’re either a dilettante or an amateur. […]
Willo Perron
[…] My advice for anybody is just to make things, you have to engage in things. […]
Willo Perron
[…] just make stuff, keep making stuff. […]
Willo Perron
[…] Remember your work, your ideas have value, and you shouldn’t be giving your shit away. I’m not precious about the ideas, if it’s not good then move on, but I just don’t think you should be giving shit away for other people to do something with it. […]
Willo Perron
[…] just make things!
People want to see your opinion, that’s what I care about when I look at people’s work, I want to see their opinion. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] Get experience. And when you think of your brand, there are so many things on the market it’s a little egocentric to say that yours is going to be successful (…) You shouldn’t be afraid to go for it but you’ve got to be prepared and you’ve got to understand what that means. You have people who believe in you, people you invite to the showroom, journalists, so it’s tough when it doesn’t work out. But you have to believe, you have to give yourself a little time. […]

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