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24 excerpts on the topic “Clients”
Clementine Berry
[…] With a client who’s got years of experience, we like to go through their archives to get a sense of what has been done from their inception until now, why they want a new identity, why they want to communicate differently, why they want a campaign… You need to know the entire history of their projects. By exploring the archives, by diving deep — that’s where you find the nuggets; then you get creative and come up with a true expression of who they are. […]
Clementine Berry
[…] The more people trust you, the more a project is successful. […]
Clementine Berry
[…] When people trust you and you bust your tail, it’s no longer work. When the clients don’t listen to what you say and want to do something different and you’re constantly forced to fight them without ever getting to do what you want to do, then it’s work! […]
Clementine Berry
[…] There’s one thing that comes with age and wisdom, and that’s self-confidence. In the beginning, I was intimidated around clients. That state of affairs lasted a long time. Now they trust us more and it’s easier to get our ideas across. Well, it doesn’t work systematically and sometimes you have to know when to throw in the towel. […]
Clementine Berry
[…] I prefer working with people over several years, because during the first year you try to understand how they work, the second year you’ve got it down, things are moving forward, and then the third year the confidence level is high and everything is clicking. […]
Dinamo
[…] We always have a balance between these two: self initiated projects where we have full autonomy and control, and commissions where we open up space for an outside party to develop a dialogue. Both are extremely interesting and rewarding. But with commissions there is often a danger of time pressure and therefore compromises. Not that everything always has to be our way. But we really dislike shipping things that could be improved. […]
Dinamo
[…] The cynical me would say that a lot of commissions are flawed from the start, and they always will be, and we need to learn how to spot them. Too tight to a deadline to really talk, get to know each other and develop something. Unjustified hierarchies, muddy dependencies or ego driven desires. Basic moodboards and plain “hype idea” recycling. I shed a tear for our industry each time we find these requests in our inbox; picturing the hidden dynamics that lead to such requests give me goosebumps. […]
Marc Armand
[…] The art of the brief is difficult. A brief both clear and precise is rare. For a designer, deciphering a brief is the challenge. It’s not the client’s job to prepare briefs, except for communications managers. Which brings me to another piece of advice I would give: learn to decipher a brief, ask the client loads of questions, interest yourself in their business, the better to understand them. What does the client want beyond what they are telling you? […]
Marc Armand
[…] I try to be generous and flexible, and always professional. Take Nike, for example, I gave them everything I had in mind for our first project.
This has often been my method. Clients tend to like my initial ideas because there are lots of things to see. […]
Random Studio
[…] DL
I am responsible for new business and if there’s a new client, I want to meet them. So my design approach – and it’s a big part of the quality of the project – is reading the room, making a connection with people: who are they? What are they concerned about? What are they inspired by? And who in our studio can react in a way that is relevant for these people? How do we work with them in a way that they keep feeding the inspiration, the creation and so we’re not afraid that it might go wrong? I really try to tune in… My part is more the tuning in on the human level. […]
Random Studio
[…] DL
When you really want to be a partner for a client you have to have a strategic point of view on the world we both operate in, from a holistic point of view. Not only the market but what is happening in the world on a grander scheme […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
Clients wanting something because they’ve seen it on Instagram or whatever. But we just don’t work with those people. It curves the expectations. […]
John Pawson
[…] I wasn’t really the best architect for my clients, because I didn’t really listen to them. Clients talked about compromise. To me that was an awful word, but they kept telling me that compromise was a wonderful thing – that this is how the world works. So I managed to alienate three of my biggest clients.
By the time Calvin (Klein) came, I had been used to making all the decisions myself. Calvin had his own aesthetic, he had his own design ideas and I was there to make his store. That was a big learning curve that really changed my thinking, because I started to listen. I realised how important the client and the collaboration are. […]
Golgotha
[…] There’s always a client who makes you work a little bit harder; and that’s how you improve. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Presenting ideas has to be as straight and direct as possible. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Every brand or collaborator is different in the way we deal with them. You have to build trust with them and build a conversation where they understand your creative thinking and your problem solving. They must be willing to take the risk. And you have to show them why it’s important to take risks. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] You have to build trust with clients and build a conversation where they understand your creative thinking and your problem solving. They must be willing to take the risk. And you have to show them why it’s important to take risks. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] However, nowadays, when a big company decides to redesign their logo, talent, creativity, and vision are not considered essential. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] In my profession you can never think for one second that people comprehend what you’re doing. They’re incapable of telling the difference between a good logo and a bad logo, a good font and a bad font. A rule is to only show options you’re proud of, so you’ll be pleased no matter what they choose. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] When faced with such a complete misapprehension of our profession you have no choice but to educate the client. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] Remember when you went to the movies and you were actually happy to see those 15 minutes of advertising? Remember that time? And you would say: “Jeans… Levis … ah, nice! New message, I haven’t seen that one”. We had these times. And now clients are a big marketing thing: all these surveys, what everybody wants, how to convince and be convenient to everybody, wanting to be liked by everybody. Brands and products have this problem too. If you go to the annual Milan Salon, over all these years, all these new chairs are coming out. They all look like one another. There’s almost no signature piece behind it anymore. No one is daring. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] One of the other problem is that all this generation of young marketing guys have changed sides from agency to client. And they are now the leading points in the marketing department of these big companies and they haven’t learned differently, they only have one way.
 You guys are also teaching in these schools. You still know that if you have an ‘after’ in a club in France where all these advertising people are running around and you’re talking to them about their industry, none of them would ever admit how bad the quality is at the moment. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (MS) We know, especially when you work with clients, that people have to present internally before – but sometimes it’s a bit of a pity when an art director comes up with images from other artists for example, or some materials and show them to the client. Especially if they are not creatives, it can be very hard for them to let it go. Even for us; if they show us a picture which may be a very good one that really explains the project, it’s very hard to get rid of it. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (MS) For every project we ask ourselves: “Does the client fits us, or do we fit the client?” and “Can we add something to what they have in mind?”
When we’re not sure, we make a concept, send it over, and see the feedback. If it says: “Maybe we can stick to the other one”, we know we should not work together, because it means we cannot help each other. It’s not a way of being arrogant but it’s more that you want to make something… […]

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