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18 excerpts on the topic “Creativity”
OK-RM
[…] OK
When you’re starting something it’s always useful to have a counterpoint, or something you’re rejecting. I think we definitely started with a strong realisation that we needed to do something differently than what we had experienced. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
you have to be willing to tear things down and start again. As hard as that can be, it can be very rewarding. Both personally, as a business and creatively, you have to be willing to tear things down. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JF
Just study the career of Aphex Twin and you will learn a lot about the meaning of creativity. […]
Services Généraux
[…] We don’t go to enough exhibitions, movies, we’re missing the stories and things that usually stimulate creativity. […]
Services Généraux
[…] A
You need to have material set aside. If you have a thousand ideas per second, it’s because you’re always coming up with the same thousand ideas. […]
Services Généraux
[…] I love what Ben Gorham, the founder of BYREDO says: that he makes his money with perfume and reinvests everything in the narration, because the stories he tells will always contribute to better defining the brand’s conceptual and artistic identity. […]
Services Généraux
[…] All artistic directors nowadays are incredibly spoiled by the corpus of references at their disposal. That definitely wasn’t the case in the 1970s. It’s the gift and the curse. You have an enormous amount of pressure on you to come up with something original even though it’s almost impossible and that all that remains is intertextuality. You just have to grieve the loss of originality. […]
Golgotha
[…] GH
Once we get the brief the three of us read it and then we might decide to have a meeting to talk about it. But that never happens. The effort that goes into having a brainstorming meeting is hardcore and never works. Because that’s not how creativity works. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] If you lose your curiosity for a designer, or for design thinking, or your curiosity for the way things look or how they are made, then you lose your ability to find inspiration. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Design just sort of pours out of me and I don’t know any other thing I would do, it’s just who I am, my nature. Some designers find this is similar to exhaustion and being burnt out, but you can find new places to experience visual media, you take a break, have a conversation with people and it reinvigorates that. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] you’re creating ingredients for designers to make meaning. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Always make work for yourself even if you have a job. Make sure you don’t just clock and do
work and go home and not make anything. It’s important to always use your time as a designer, it’s a form of your own expression, how you use your work to be personal, whether no one sees it or not. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] We really try to push this idea of not thinking as an individual, but thinking as a whole. We try to all sit in one room, on one table, and everyone is there with their laptops, so it keeps distances very short. Everybody can help each other out, as well […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] But, you’re never going to do the whole thing in your whole life, or you’re just a one-man-show. I mean, obviously you can do everything alone but coming from graffiti, I always used to be in a group, or working together with a lot of people, being inspired and learning from the way others work. It’s more fun to be creative in a group of people rather than sitting alone at home and thinking that you’re a genius. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] We believe in the trinity: pure, simple, and powerful. We strive to get to the essence of a brand, strategically and creatively – that’s the purity. Then we bring it to life with a design as simple as possible. If you succeed in this approach, by definition the visual identity will be powerful and live beyond trends of fashion and taste […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] following trends and fashion is not bad, there is a reason for it, and it comes and goes. But it’s just you need to be conscious of it and try to create your own answer and reality, that’s what is important. […]
Willo Perron
[…] I wish things were less trendy. I love idiosyncrasies, the weird guy in the corner. I appreciate the courage it takes to be different and that’s who we should embrace. People that take real risks in their opinions and expose their guts to the public. That’s what we should embrace as artists, designers, etc not the one super on trend, those are the vampires, the one taking from those who have real ideas. […]
Willo Perron
[…] The creativity is this amorphic, amoebic thing, super old guys do incredible stuff and brand new kids do incredible stuff. There is not a current. If there is one thing that is incredible about arts, the arts, art and design is that we all have a common thread. I’m fascinated by somebody who is 80 years old who is doing work that’s cool, as much as I am by a kid who is 14 years old and doing some work. And we can all hang out and learn from each others. And there is a necessary youth to creativity, to be able to play with things, to make mistakes. […]

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