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11 excerpts on the topic “Communication”
Ezequiel Pini
[…] Then for the brand identity side, that’s really me. I do it in my free time. Sometimes at night an image comes to me of something we did a long time ago and I post it. I got on Twitter because it’s very connected to communities and to the NFT world, and also my idea for the future is to have my own community of collectors, of fans, of people to talk to peer-to-peer. Instagram is more like a portfolio. I manage all the social media […]
Ezequiel Pini
[…] Broadly speaking, what generates success is perspective, authenticity, what you do with your own language, your own way of communicating, which is what I rely on a lot in terms of how I interact with people in general, with my family, with my friends, with new people. […]
Jonghwan Baek
[…] We were reading those international design platforms online and offline, but we did not even imagine our projects on those magazines. It was something related with the Korean tradition of being modest, of not showing off too much. But when we saw that it was working out, we started to proactively send out every projects to the international press, hoping to be published. Not sure if all these were “strategic”, but it was persistence. We kept sending out our names and projects to the world. […]
Dinamo
[…] JB
Before, we wrote all things ourselves for Dinamo, in plain and beautiful Art School English. The personal bits and anecdotes around any creation always felt more interesting to us. There are other foundries constantly nodding to history and making that part of their own identity. We respectfully tend to take history as a point of departure, a source we admire. But our communication is less “how it started”, but more “how it’s going”, and who was involved? We might publish a font and you could say “I feel some royal vibes, let’s make up a story with an old king. Maybe he’s a bit mad and sips Coca Cola. We can make this tangible, a fantasy mystery.” And it works. […]
Ada Sokół
[…] You need to be focused on your work, and advertising is time-consuming. I don’t have any strategy. I’m pleased to be interviewed by you, but on the other side, this is not my work. I feel that I am working when my entire focus is on creating. Maybe I should start working with a PR person with more experience, plan, and general knowledge? […]
Random Studio
[…] DL
How we contextualise these case studies in a way that they talk about our holistic vision and not only “OK, we got a job from this client and we produced this in this, and it was open to this and this store blah blah blah”. I think it could be more contextualised by what we believe in. […]
Services Généraux
[…] A
Instagram and the press don’t offer the same thing. One generates audience, the other an authoritative argument (…) which reassures the client. Those are the two parts of the media that interest us. For visibility we depend on digital; for authority we need print. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] It’s very rare for someone to be successful without working on visibility. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] We had a big call in here where I said that we should maybe change the website, the whole Instagram account, and the way we communicate on these channels. I don’t know how, I was just saying that somehow it’s like the same thing, the website and Instagram: we’re just showing pictures. It’s not telling any story, it doesn’t feel that modern anymore. It’s not fitting for the media and not questioning Instagram as a tool. How much effort should we put into a media, which is actually – in my opinion – not that interesting anymore. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] If you don’t create your own organic buzz, if you don’t go viral or if you’re not Swiss — that is to say if your reputation is not already made — it all comes down to investing in communication. However, if you don’t have the money to do that you have to build by focusing on your company’s core values, and the talented designers whose work you promote. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Part of my communication strategy is to remain present in the minds of the decision-makers. When a client sees a list of three, five, ten typographies, it’s imperative for us to be on that list. To reach this goal, first we need a catalogue that makes us relevant as well as present in the mind of the buyer. This goal can be met rather easily. The second one is harder. It’s a daily effort to put your reputation out there, and build and increase brand awareness. […]

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