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44 excerpts on the topic “Strategy”
Ezequiel Pini
[…] I didn’t feel like myself doing this so in my free time I would always try to work on personal projects, things that I liked, my own ideas and designs how I imagined them. That was on the weekends or during off-hours.
Without realizing it, things started changing and there was a kind of snowball effect: the more I created things I liked, shared them and drew attention to them, the more other commissions would come in. […]
Ezequiel Pini
[…] I want to focus a little more on artistic ventures, to leave the more commercial stuff on the side and only take on certain projects. Now we’re at this turning point and focused more on artistic and personal projects than on commercial ones. […]
Ezequiel Pini
[…] There are three of us, but two more guys will be joining our team. For the next couple of years, my plan is to keep a super solid, small team, to work well together, to execute the ideas the way I envision them, for me to be able to keep doing what makes me passionate, which is to sit down and design, but in my own very personal way. […]
Ezequiel Pini
[…] Then for the brand identity side, that’s really me. I do it in my free time. Sometimes at night an image comes to me of something we did a long time ago and I post it. I got on Twitter because it’s very connected to communities and to the NFT world, and also my idea for the future is to have my own community of collectors, of fans, of people to talk to peer-to-peer. Instagram is more like a portfolio. I manage all the social media […]
Jonghwan Baek
[…] I would like to do more projects that can be understood by a broader range of people, beyond any barriers of language, nationality and regionality. Those architectural and spatial projects we are doing to be in a more global situation. […]
Jonghwan Baek
[…] We were reading those international design platforms online and offline, but we did not even imagine our projects on those magazines. It was something related with the Korean tradition of being modest, of not showing off too much. But when we saw that it was working out, we started to proactively send out every projects to the international press, hoping to be published. Not sure if all these were “strategic”, but it was persistence. We kept sending out our names and projects to the world. […]
Clementine Berry
[…] Producing objects is a rather heavy undertaking, so we could perhaps begin with a very limited number of pieces and see how it goes, because it’s an amazing experience as well as a great way of communicating. […]
Dinamo
[…] jokes aside. When there is bigger question marks growing at Dinamo, we sometimes take out some time and visit our friend Michael on his farm in the south of Germany. He’s a sort of crossbred between business adviser, philosopher and grandfather to us. And always has great ears and thoughts for our troubles. […]
Dinamo
[…] FH
Another big learning curve was realizing the difference between time-based and sales-based rewards. That was when we started to meet with Michael and figured that there is no space for “yours” or “mine” within Dinamo, and that everything just is “us”.
 […]
Dinamo
[…] JB
You could call that a strategy maybe? It is a great filter to decide: if it isn’t equally interesting for everybody involved, it’s probably better we don’t do it. The same way we don’t differentiate between tasks or projects anymore, but just take everything equally seriously. […]
Dinamo
[…] FH
It really has become a value-based licensing now: small companies pay small fees, medium companies pay medium fees, and large companies pay large fees. It sounds banal, but it was a lot of discussion to get here. About how people select licences, or how people select fonts. And what question should be asked from our side. And when and how. We even tried to use our collected data to play through predictions. Our new system seemed fair to everybody we sat down with. But if people on the internet wouldn’t understand and accept the change, it could have meant a huge loss. […]
Marc Armand
[…] People want to work with you because of what you have already done. So if you want to do this or that, you need to do it proactively, beforehand, to give direction to your work and portfolio. […]
Elizaveta Porodina
[…] Strategy can seem like a very cold, practical pragmatic word, but what it really is is self-care. […]
Elizaveta Porodina
[…] (Strategy) is realising who you are, what you really like, who you want to surround yourself with, who are the people that you really want in your life. Who benefits your mind and your passion? Who contributes the most to your art? Who makes you ultimately better? […]
Random Studio
[…] DL
When you really want to be a partner for a client you have to have a strategic point of view on the world we both operate in, from a holistic point of view. Not only the market but what is happening in the world on a grander scheme […]
Random Studio
[…] DL
We worked with a philosopher, Andre Platteel, to create a strategy for our studio. As mentioned earlier we live in challenging but also interesting ever‑changing times. We were looking for a strategy that felt more like a fluid construct. Something to refer back to, but also something that was able to change and adapt. […]
OK-RM
[…] RM
Strategy is a funny thing, too. It’s a bit like graphic design: no one knows what it means. Because conceptual art is strategy, it’s only strategy (…) in that sense, we consider strategy and conceptual thinking very aligned, and that’s basically what we do. We are absolutely strategic. […]
OK-RM
[…] OK
We see the role of the graphic designer as having the potential to be very much in the middle of all the decisions. And if you can negotiate with those around you then you can… I mean, that’s the strategy isn’t it? It’s a negotiation. It’s about relationships with other people that make the decisions. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
The realisation that we needed to be strategic was one of necessity (…) and when you realise that your choices actually make the success you have, you can’t help but be more interested in it. So what other decisions can we make? Where else can we bring change? […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JF
It just comes down to assessing the landscape, assessing your situation in a very honest way, even if that analysis hurts (…) If you build a strategy upon a falsehood, then I think that strategy is probably doomed to fail. Taking a cold hard look at your situation, and then building a response from that seems like the natural way of doing thing, when you read about strategy, that’s one of the first things they say. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] You need to be able to pivot… […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] That’s important to us: what does it mean, what does it make you feel and why. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Every brand or collaborator is different in the way we deal with them. You have to build trust with them and build a conversation where they understand your creative thinking and your problem solving. They must be willing to take the risk. And you have to show them why it’s important to take risks. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] You have to build trust with clients and build a conversation where they understand your creative thinking and your problem solving. They must be willing to take the risk. And you have to show them why it’s important to take risks. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Strategy is just a creative thinking that involves design. It’s very much part of how we think. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] I love the Germs! Actually, their strategy was they made T‐shirts before they made any songs.
They had T‐shirts before they even played a show or had a song which is kind of interesting,
much. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] In the end, my strategy is to attempt to help people understand design. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I have a great thirst for knowledge about the ways other people go about their business (…) I like to talk with product designers, I like to talk with architects, with the guys who build my skis, etc. And see how business models in other fields can be applied – or not – to our profession. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Strategy in our field, alas, usually all comes down to the network. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] When faced with such a complete misapprehension of our profession you have no choice but to educate the client. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] All the designers work on it. It’s very important for designers to know that. That’s the problem I have with graphic design in a way. A lot of graphic design looks good but doesn’t really make sense, and there’s not really a higher idea behind it. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] As long as the idea is good and there’s a good strategy behind it, it stays good for a long time. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] We’re in the middle of a new transformation. We have some basic ideas for the future. We don’t want to just offer services, we also want to offer products which normally, as a design studio, you would offer, like t-shirts, sweaters, posters, books, whatever. But actually our real aim is digital solutions for a kind of communication around smaller businesses. That’s also part of what we’re discussing at the moment, which would also allow us to move to a different stage. It sounds super boring, I know. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] We believe in the trinity: pure, simple, and powerful. We strive to get to the essence of a brand, strategically and creatively – that’s the purity. Then we bring it to life with a design as simple as possible. If you succeed in this approach, by definition the visual identity will be powerful and live beyond trends of fashion and taste […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] We don’t randomly sketch and hopefully it’s a hit or miss. The process always starts with strategy.
First, the strategy is developed and when there is a clear strategy or a positioning, then we start sketching. We always refer back to a strategy. First strategy, then sketching, and then strategy and the whole concept: the visual result comes together. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Nowadays, most design studio or agencies integrate strategy within their work, I see that also in smaller studios. In the past that wasn’t really in the vocabulary of a designer. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) A strategy is not a guarantee of success…
(MS)…Sometimes producing work is the best thing to do! […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) back to the question of strategy: through our series we meet people and by meeting these people, we get new collaborations if it fits. Ideas are coming together (…) the pictures are also a motor in a way, they’re the engine for the road we take, the journey in meeting people. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] If you don’t create your own organic buzz, if you don’t go viral or if you’re not Swiss — that is to say if your reputation is not already made — it all comes down to investing in communication. However, if you don’t have the money to do that you have to build by focusing on your company’s core values, and the talented designers whose work you promote. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Part of my communication strategy is to remain present in the minds of the decision-makers. When a client sees a list of three, five, ten typographies, it’s imperative for us to be on that list. To reach this goal, first we need a catalogue that makes us relevant as well as present in the mind of the buyer. This goal can be met rather easily. The second one is harder. It’s a daily effort to put your reputation out there, and build and increase brand awareness. […]
Willo Perron
[…] The only strategic thing that we do is that we start by doing research, then we throw all the research out and look at it, then narrow it down to ‘yeah we think that’s the vernacular’. Then we present that, there is a discussion between us and the client, there is an edit and then there is a design. […]
Willo Perron
[…] I think the impediment of over-strategizing, and any time that people do design by committee, it just dilutes ideas and it’s just the bad version of an idea. […]
Willo Perron
[…] The goal is to build a community of thinkers creating amazing things. That’s my strategy
fundamentally. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] You’ve got to look at the whole package: good design and a good visual identity. You can have good design but completely screw up your image. You’ve really got to strike the right balance. Products, photos, models: a brand is so many things; and design isn’t necessarily the most time‑consuming aspect of it. […]

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