D
47 excerpts on the topic “Development”
OK-RM
[…] RM
We work a lot with Jack Self, and he’s a very important collaborator. He always has a special way of talking about his career in 10 years plans. As a way to kind of conceptualise a career, or a project, a career as a project, and I think that’s something that we also tried to do because it’s an interesting exercise. We do talk about this kind of idea of where we are headed, what’s the project, what’s the concept of the studio. […]
OK-RM
[…] RM
We also wanted to strategically question, but also perfect, a financial model that would allow and support the work to take place in another way. So by owning the economy of the work (editor’s note: InOtherWords), we can start to generate opportunities for ourselves, and we don’t have to be the victims of budget issues, which are very passive when you’re a designer relying on commissions. We can start to be a bit more entrepreneurial, which is useful. […]
OK-RM
[…] OK
Find a project. I don’t mean a commission. What is it that you want to spend your life working within? I think it’s one of the big questions for design, because you can be a designer on millions of different types of projects, with different messages. What is it, as a designer, that you believe? (…) It’s more about a discipline within which you operate. Because design is a tool at the end of the day. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
The realisation that we needed to be strategic was one of necessity (…) and when you realise that your choices actually make the success you have, you can’t help but be more interested in it. So what other decisions can we make? Where else can we bring change? […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JF
The nature of things is that there’s constant flux and change and to be flexible with that reality is a far more effective way of navigating a career. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
you have to be willing to tear things down and start again. As hard as that can be, it can be very rewarding. Both personally, as a business and creatively, you have to be willing to tear things down. […]
Services Généraux
[…] I love what Ben Gorham, the founder of BYREDO says: that he makes his money with perfume and reinvests everything in the narration, because the stories he tells will always contribute to better defining the brand’s conceptual and artistic identity. […]
Services Généraux
[…] A
Very early on we wanted to make money so that the structure could give us the freedom to do exactly what we want without becoming less relevant creatively speaking. Sometimes we take on very commercial projects that we’re less fond of in exchange for the money and time necessary to produce (…) the projects that really define us and that we love doing. […]
Services Généraux
[…] Today we realise that growing doesn’t preclude expanding. We’re able to take on more creative tasks while delegating more and more of the production. […]
Services Généraux
[…] A
In order to grow our business we need to undo the connection of labour to value. The labour we provide is finite, but the value has to be infinite. And you have to try to achieve that through sexiness, storytelling, and everything else that can be brought to bear. […]
Services Généraux
[…] A
To create a studio such as SG you need no investment other than time. For people who are less attracted to entrepreneurship and corporate management – the truly business side of a creative design studio – it might be a good idea to join forces with someone, to get trained and team up with a business angel. […]
John Pawson
[…] It’s this harnessing of other people’s talents and creativity. […]
John Pawson
[…] You’ve just got to do what you want to do. The satisfaction will follow – not necessarily the money, but the satisfaction. You just need a client and it’s quite good to have somebody to work with, because it’s quite lonely otherwise […]
Golgotha
[…] GH
When we don’t know how to do something we figure out how to do it anyway. Sometimes it turns out the way we wanted, sometimes not… […]
Golgotha
[…] Perseverance quite simply. The mental fortitude necessary to totally get behind each project. And not be strictly beholden to the budget. […]
Golgotha
[…] Now if someone wants to invest in our company, in our talent, if we retain 100 %creative say‑so, we can always sit down and talk. If it’s in terms of administrative duties or other things of that nature, why not, some are very talented and it could be very profitable for us. But control over the creative process and decision‑making comes first. […]
Golgotha
[…] GH
If you get out of school and go to work for someone, even if it’s going well and you’re happy you will never say to yourself that you’re going to launch a studio. It’s too late. Whereas the opposite is possible: try it out and if you fail you can go work elsewhere, no hard feelings. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] We wanted to pivot and expand, not just be the guys who were doing cool music stuff. I think we enjoyed that, but we have much larger inspirations. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Design just sort of pours out of me and I don’t know any other thing I would do, it’s just who I am, my nature. Some designers find this is similar to exhaustion and being burnt out, but you can find new places to experience visual media, you take a break, have a conversation with people and it reinvigorates that. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] We are able to make products and make ideas and develop things for others, but we want to make things that represent us. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] We want to expand and do bigger projects, but we also want to build our own intellectual property, our own work, and work for ourselves. Moving forward that’s sort of a big thing. We are able to make products and make ideas and develop things for others, but we want to make things that represent us. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] I think as a designer we are constantly jumping from making something that’s print, making something that’s moving, making something that’s real, making something that’s 60 feet, making something that’s one inch. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Unlike agencies, we don’t take financial risks that force us to land enormous moneymaking projects just to be able to pay our employees. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I was talking about this with a friend the other day who told me that Tom Dixon lost control of his furniture company after he brought investors onboard. The idea, for me, is to keep control of my businesses. Which is why I created a holding company. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Mathieu Lehanneur summed it up for me when he said he wanted to be an author rather than a service provider. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] What I wonder is if there is a business model for this kind of thing, i.e. getting brands to pay us to make magazines for them and for other brands – their potential competitors – on the same premises and by the same team. And use the money and my staff to publish my own magazine or other magazines. Production and organization are the crux of the matter. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] In our business there’s no reason not to adopt forms of equity payment or royalties. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I have a great thirst for knowledge about the ways other people go about their business (…) I like to talk with product designers, I like to talk with architects, with the guys who build my skis, etc. And see how business models in other fields can be applied – or not – to our profession. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] When I did my first magazine it was for the Süddeutsche Zeitung, which is one of the biggest daily newspapers in Germany. It was a magazine for young people, which came every Monday as a supplement in the newspaper. They didn’t have any money at all, so we actually could do whatever we wanted. I had the chance to do my own illustrations in the magazine because we had to save money for some photoshoots.
Even if the photographer was a student and didn’t get that much money, we still paid the travel expenses. Jurgen Teller, at the end of his twenties, did his first photos for this magazine, and Wolfgang Tillmans too. A lot of actually famous German photographers started in that magazine. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] We’re in the middle of a new transformation. We have some basic ideas for the future. We don’t want to just offer services, we also want to offer products which normally, as a design studio, you would offer, like t-shirts, sweaters, posters, books, whatever. But actually our real aim is digital solutions for a kind of communication around smaller businesses. That’s also part of what we’re discussing at the moment, which would also allow us to move to a different stage. It sounds super boring, I know. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] It used to be the same here. They wanted to buy my office for ages, but we never sold it. Now it turns out that we have better clients and better connections than they would ever have. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] DEMO, it’s for Design in Motion Festival is definitely one of my favourites. We initiated, organised and designed the largest motion festival in the world!
I think it was as early as 2017 that we had the idea to share the beautiful work we were seeing with a wider audience and create an exhibition accessible to a bigger public (…) 24 hours to showcase motion designs from designers all around the world. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Nowadays, most design studio or agencies integrate strategy within their work, I see that also in smaller studios. In the past that wasn’t really in the vocabulary of a designer. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] with the studio in the last years, we focused more and more on motion. This didn’t happen accidentally, it’s something that we really looked into, something that we wanted. It felt comfortable in the development of our work but also, we felt that within design, it was the next step. If motion is the next step, then that means you need to make room for designers to learn more motion, or the next person you hire needs to have motion skills. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Long-term focus really helps you, and it helps you personally. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] When it comes to taking the next step in digital, you either grow a team or combine forces with someone who is already strong in digital. We could have made the team grow, but we got the opportunity: we were asked by Dept if we would like to join them. […]
Scheltens & Abbenes
[…] (LA) Also as you grow older you may want to stay healthy. If you are always in a red race and only work like hell to pay the mortgage, it may not be an interesting place to be in the future. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] If you don’t create your own organic buzz, if you don’t go viral or if you’re not Swiss — that is to say if your reputation is not already made — it all comes down to investing in communication. However, if you don’t have the money to do that you have to build by focusing on your company’s core values, and the talented designers whose work you promote. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] The thing I enjoy in this business is meeting people. Learning from them, sharing viewpoints, talking. That is perhaps why I could never myself be an employee, because after a while unless you take a lot of meetings your job ends up being repetitive. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] My metaphor is Super Mario 3: to get Mario to fly you have to press the A button repeatedly. It’s through action that you stay in the game. To stagnate is to perish. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Critical distance, introspection, and a talent for self-criticism — these things are essential. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Grow and expand your network. If purchasing databases was all you needed, then everyone would be successful. Essentially it all boils down to being a nice, fun and interesting guy to meet, someone who not only doesn’t waste your time but actually brings something to the table. You’ve got to have humanity, that quality that makes meeting you a pleasant experience. […]
Willo Perron
[…] People won’t hire you if they don’t know what you do. If you are not getting hired, then just make things, it’s not that complicated. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] You’ve got to look at the whole package: good design and a good visual identity. You can have good design but completely screw up your image. You’ve really got to strike the right balance. Products, photos, models: a brand is so many things; and design isn’t necessarily the most time‑consuming aspect of it. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] A collection should express a variety of things. And that comes with experience. You look at what sells because you’re a brand after all, you need to be successful to continue, to keep hiring and growing. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] But since it’s impossible to do everything, I need people I can trust. I made sure to have people around me who are competent in fields that I am not competent in. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] I can’t say I made bad choices or mistakes and even if I did, that’s how you learn. I think I’ve got the right people around me and I was prepared. One of the reasons it worked out is because I had experience. […]

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