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12 excerpts on the topic “Typography”
Marc Armand
[…] Nowadays, typography is about democratisation and globalization. Which is good, if it means that more people will now be doing typography. It tends to be such an obscure discipline that it’s nice for once to see a light shining on it. But it may be that a typography fad is right around the corner and might, following the reign of the Swiss, herald a return to the Emigre spirit, with experimental type fonts and destruction of the grid. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] font is always the starting mode of how I think about a project. What’s the typographic visual language? How is typography going to make people feel? Type can have so much emotion and so little emotion.
Where do you find that balance when type can communicate an idea? Every project has that
and I love the fact that type can be a powerful component in a project. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] you’re creating ingredients for designers to make meaning. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] In typography, I really like it because I feel there is much more room for experimentation. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] The economic model for typography is rather different from graphic design because we are part of those rare designers, much like product designers, whose work can be reused. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] France has traditionally excelled in the typographical field, except in the sixties and seventies, which we completely and utterly fucked up. French foundries took a beating then. And it wasn’t until the nineties — when our profession began turning away from the industrial to embrace the digital — that French designers again began to make a name for themselves. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Typography is a multitude of little chores that can be exhausting. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Every year for the past 15 years a good three dozen type designers have appeared on the scene fresh out of a training course in “type design.” Whereas before they had studied “graphic design and typography.” So you do see more typography in portfolios, on websites, in pitches. You see more typographical work overall, mostly in the media. I think this is a cyclical phenomenon. In fact the current wave might already be behind us. (…) Typography is alive and kicking thanks to the increasing number of type design students. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] What the young type designers are doing today isn’t just a trend. They are much freer in their approach to the business than we ever were. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] In type design you have lots of people who overestimate their graphic design skills. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] I get the impression that something new is brewing.
It was easy to start an e-business and produce typography rather quickly. The reason why I think we have reached the end of a cycle is because I have yet to see anything new on the horizon. Something is going to happen; it just hasn’t happened yet. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] I’m not nostalgic about a golden age of typography. When I think of how typefaces were designed in the past — and I’m not talking about the result, which is magnificent and admirable — it was nothing but suffering. […]

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