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28 excerpts on the topic “References”
Golgotha
[…] GH
Net Art was something I looked at every day. Every single day, Net Art, Tumblr, the new artists. This was via Facebook; it wasn’t easy to communicate. […]
Golgotha
[…] MD
And then there are the famous figures: we have books by Antoine+Manuel, M/M, The Designers Republic, touchstones all. Things we used to look at when we were finishing school and that we still like to look at. […]
Golgotha
[…] A person who really inspired us was Rafael Rozendaal whom we even met in Los Angeles along with many other artists. […]
Golgotha
[…] There is one book that struck me: What I talk about When I Talk About Running by Murakami. And yet I’m not into sports, but the mental toughness, the rigour applied each day impressed me. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] Skateboard and music were kind of my gateway drug. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] I love the Germs! Actually, their strategy was they made T‐shirts before they made any songs.
They had T‐shirts before they even played a show or had a song which is kind of interesting,
much. […]
Brian Roettinger
[…] I think all books you find some inspiration from. Patrick Frey the Swiss publisher makes such beautiful books. I’m thinking about those 1960s and 1970s experimental publishers
that were publishing literature like the French book club (le Club français du livre) with Pierre Faucheux. A lot of the books of Dita the artist. Making books was part of his practice, Ed Ruscha’s books, Lawrence Weiner whose work is primary typographic but as an artist he made loads of books and posters, those are a huge inspiration. Typographica the magazine, Emigre the magazine was the biggest inspiration once I got to design school. Also, the skateboard magazine Big Brother, I love. Slash magazine which I did a book on and sort of first‐wave punk magazines. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I was convinced then and still am that graphic design and craftsmanship reached a peak in terms of quality and rigour in the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s in Switzerland and the United States (I’m thinking of Müller‑Brockmann, Max Bill, that whole tradition, and the use of a limited number of typographical solutions, etc.) […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I love what George Lois said: “The more you treat the masses as intelligent adults, the more discerning and demanding they become”. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Mathieu Lehanneur summed it up for me when he said he wanted to be an author rather than a service provider. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] Primo Levi’s Other People’s Trades. It’s a collection of essays mainly about engineers doing their jobs (…) It reads like fiction as he tells the adventures and misadventures of people working, the problems engineers face and how they solve them. It’s fascinating and I think all professions have the potential to generate as much passion as mine. […]
Yorgo Tloupas
[…] I love Herzog & de Meuron, who manage to accomplish something that I don’t like too much in my profession: the graphic gesture. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] At that time London was like one of the places to study graphic design because of Neville Brody, a lot of other people, magazines like i-D, The Face, you know, all these things were happening. It was the beginning of the 1990s, the beginning of the whole rave culture, club culture, a lot of flyers, Ministry of Sound, the Wag, all these clubs. That’s the only reason I went there to study. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] Jost Hochuli, Detail in Typography. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] An artist or a person whose work has helped you in terms of development?
Pierre Mendell. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] One of my design heroes is Tibor Kalman, I think he is an unbelievable man. I used to collect all of the Colors magazines from Benetton. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] In “professional” terms, there are several “historic” influences, including for example Ladislas Mandel. He was one of the first type designers to work independently after a long career in industrial type design. He was of the same generation as Adrian Frutiger, another type designer who turned his back on the use of his work by an industry rooted in metallurgy. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] As for art, I’m mainly interested in American sixties conceptual art, Donald Judd for example, and light artist James Turrell, the master of us all. I like to cite Turrell as “by far the best type designer out there”. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Pierre-Simon Fournier. And some contemporaries, who are influences, friends, and models: Christian Schwartz, and Kris Sowersby. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] How to Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul by Adrian Shaughnessy is one of the only ones I read all the way through, about fifteen years ago. It was educational; not foundational but educational. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Sapiens. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Olafur Eliasson. And Caravaggio, who was something of a businessman himself. […]
Willo Perron
[…] I love people who have weird practices. I like super contemporary people and then… I love
going to the museum in Amsterdam and looking at the still lives. The super saturated images
and the colours are so incredible. I love super modern photography. I feel dropping names of
artists is almost like having a blog. […]
Willo Perron
[…] I think that Beuys was cool as fuck, like performing and objects. Just really all over the place. I
like people… Like Louise Bourgeois. There are so many people who are incredible! The vision
of Donald Judd. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] Margiela, yes, because it’s a conceptual brand. She’s kind of unique in fashion since brands are mainly focused on producing pretty things. I like it when a little more thought goes into it. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] In truth, I get my inspiration from artists who “divert” or “transform” things – such as Erwin Wurm. I love everything he does; his One Minute Sculptures are a great source of inspiration. Fashion itself inspires me less. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] I love Dada, the surrealists, and I must say I’m not averse to pop art, it’s totally innovative and again, uses transformation as a tool. I also love conceptual art in general, Marcel Broodthaers for example; his aesthetic is incredible. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] In terms of business, my dream model is COMME des GARÇONS. I love that brand. They don’t do a lot of accessories, but they still have beautiful leather goods and they also invested in young brands, especially through their concept‑stores. […]

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