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14 excerpts on the topic “Management”
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JE
What has been the success of our work is that we build the right teams around projects, we find the right people to bring on board. We have a group of people we love working with, so it creates a nice rhythm to the projects. We all know each other, strengths and weaknesses, and how to bounce them out. […]
Tomorrow Bureau
[…] JF
You never really know someone until you work with them. […]
John Pawson
[…] The body of the work is the sum of a group of around 20 people, a lot of whom have been with me for more than 20 years. They’re not necessarily minimalists. They all have their own strong aesthetic, but for the time they’re with me, they try and fit in with the rules. I’d always rather have a good architect than a minimal architect. […]
John Pawson
[…] I’ve made a point of making sure that the salaries are significantly higher than in other offices in London. It’s what I would call a shutout call. I don’t ever want someone coming and saying: “Can I have a word with you? I think I should get a bit more”. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] It’s possible for me to communicate in the office, considering everybody equal, as long as I’m describing myself and acting as a graphic designer.
 It doesn’t give the whole picture though, everyone knows that it’s my studio here anyway. I have to buy the toilet paper, and the coffee, and that stuff, but just like in communications: it’s good to have no hierarchy. […]
Mirko Borsche
[…] Everyone is working as a fixed employee and has a fixed contract, with social payments, and some of the health payments coming from the office. It’s important that everybody has a good and clear, clean feeling about their job at the studio. Since the beginning of Covid, we’ve never sent anybody home. I mean to work from home yes, but no temporary unemployment, no shorter working times, and lower wages. We never did this and we’re not going to do that. This is very important to us, because people working here feel secure. […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] Whatever works best for the project. I’m more there as a creative director to guide, to help designers to push their ideas further. I always say I know where we have to go, but I don’t know the road to get there. We need to leave it open to get to an answer, then you will be surprised. If you give strict design directions, you also limit the results.
It’s more coaching, guiding, and directing – not in a dictator’s way … Unless we get to five minutes before the deadline! (laugh) […]
Liza Enebeis
[…] when you are 6 years old, you don’t make a statement like: “Oh yes I’d like to be a manager!” (laugh). I learnt it on the way, I’m learning it … I’m still learning. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] The weekly review. I know this might not be a big fan favourite but up until now I think the team has appreciated communicating and having supplemental interaction on the work we’re doing. It’s crucial in terms of coordination. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] How to Be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul by Adrian Shaughnessy is one of the only ones I read all the way through, about fifteen years ago. It was educational; not foundational but educational. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] Twelve years ago I had a discussion with an old pro, someone who had been in the business forever, and he said: “In my career I’m most proud of the fact that I always maintained a good relationship with my employees.” I often think of that, and my inability to say the same rankles me. On the other hand, I have often over the years been critical of that utterance, because I feel it’s unrealistic. […]
Jean-Baptiste Levée
[…] I also have a responsibility toward the team and its development, toward each member’s personal growth, their career. I don’t see myself stagnating in the ten years to come. […]
Willo Perron
[…] That’s also the reason our office doesn’t really work with freelancers: we have an ideology; we like to develop a language that is our own… it’s not for the world. It’s for people who work here. It’s not like we have a freelancer and I tell him ‘hey dude, we should do this, this and this’ and then we don’t do the idea and then he goes to his next client and regurgitate my idea. That’s why we don’t work with freelancers. […]
Stephanie D’heygere
[…] But since it’s impossible to do everything, I need people I can trust. I made sure to have people around me who are competent in fields that I am not competent in. […]

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